Captive

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Jide had been sat with the bag over his head for at least a day. They had moved him so many times. Sunlight had streamed through the tiny holes in the bag many hours ago, but now there was only darkness and the muffled voices of his captors. 

“Missing your little pet, young prince?” a gruff voice said close to Jide’s ear.

Jide turned his head away from the voice and the alcohol laced breath that accompanied it. He had a limited range of movement, his hands and feet were tied up, but he could move his neck and twist his body if he needed to.

“My father’s soldier’s will find me and deal with all of you,” Jide said, hoping his voice sounded defiant through the fabric of the bag.

His captors laughed. 

“They’ll never find us,” said a voice. “This deep in the forest, they would be crazy to even try.”

Just then a bird cawed. Jide sat up straight. It cawed again.  Jide cawed back, as loud as he could to compensate for the obstruction.

His captors laughed again.

“So you are missing your bird friend,” said the gruff voice. “Don’t worry, your skeleton will make friends with the birds pecking at your carcass when we’re finished with you.”

Jide allowed his body to drop to the floor. His tucked his knees to his belly, making himself as small as possible. A few seconds later, he could hear the familiar sound of an arrow sweeping through the air, followed by a heavy thud as a body fell to the ground beside him. Then there were screams. Objects began to fall, and the sound of feet uncertainly faltering before breaking into a run. Then more arrows, and more thuds. All the while Jide remained absolutely still. 

What felt like hours, but surely only a chaotic few minutes, passed and a smoky, metallic silence took rest around Jide. He felt himself being dragged to his feet. The rope and the bags were removed and he found himself standing face to face with his father. There was a flutter by his ear and the familiar clutch of claws on his shoulder. 

“You trained her well,” said his father. “She led us right to you.”


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